Review Day Tuesday – The Electric Team

Ah yes, another find from Cleveland’s very own Genghis Con (yes, that’s its name). This is another book I found in 2017, much like Multi- from last week. And much like last week’s pick, this comic is another selection of intriguing writing and lackluster art. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

The story opens, weirdly enough, with an older explorer explaining how he and his team – or what’s left of his team – got to where they are. They’re explaining themselves so that the older explorer can ask whoever he’s talking to, to please take in his infant daughter and raise her in safety. And you turn the page and…

Unicorns.

The main character in this adventure is a little girl abandoned by her father to be raised by unicorns.

…Ok let me talk about the authors of this book: Abigail Connor and Leighton Connor. When this comic was written, Abigail was six. Leighton is Abigail’s dad.

Now, I haven’t read Axe Cop – but that comic came to mind after I wrote that sentence. A younger child relaying the story to an older adult and the adult writing and drawing the story down? I feel like this should be a subgenre within comics.

Knowing, though, that the co-writer of this story is a six-year-old girl makes The Electric Team make a LOT more sense.

I mean – the Electric Team is a superhero squad led by a young woman raised by unicorns. And The Electric Team is introduced as they fight a squad of humanized vegetables. Led by Commander McCarrot.

And in order to save the world, the Electric Team has to fight 1000 bad guys.

This. Is. A. Kid’s. Comic.

Knowing this makes the art make a lot more sense, as well. The art is not drawn by Abigail – the depth of field within any particular panel is too deep for a six-year-old to draw.

The art is done by Samantha Albert – and Samantha has done better art since this book came out. I remember Sam mentioning that this book was one of her first comics put to print. I’m happy to say that after reading this first issue, then looking at the webcomic site, Samantha’s art has VASTLY improved over time.

This first issue’s art isn’t…awful. But it’s unskilled – which is fitting for a story aimed at children, co-written by a six-year-old. On the plus side, as Leighton put it in his afterward in the comic, Samantha can “choreograph a fight scene and draw unicorns unironically.” And both of those skills are very important in a concept as whacky as a woman raised by unicorns and her team of superheroes who must fight 1000 bad guys to save the world.

So if a child in your life is looking for the next epic superhero adventure, encourage them to try The Electric Team.

That’s all for now. Thank you for reading!

You. Are. Awesome.

Review Day Tuesday: Multi-

Yes I got a signed copy.

If memory serves, I got this book at Genghis Con (yes, that’s its name) in Cleveland, OH in November 2017. I think the creators of this comic were my table neighbors, but it’s been long enough that I forgot the finer details.

The story of Multi- follows two kids who are searching for their parents. However, their parents keep jumping from world to world, universe to universe. And there are just some universes that they can’t handle by themselves. So what to do?

Hire a superhero, of course.

To be honest, the writing is the best part of this book, because the art is very crude. Not as crude as some of the short stories in Actionthology! But the artist of this book tends to misplace shadows in an attempt to make the art work without the use of color. That’s right – this book has black and white interior art.

I know that color printing is expensive (depending on the printer) but this is one comic that DESPERATELY NEEDS color. Black and white lines do not do this comic justice.

That said, unlike some indie comics out there, Multi- actually has legible action scenes. The most common problem with indie comics (in my experience) is that artists have no idea how to draw good action. Multi- does not have this problem. Thank goodness. The line of action is kept in mind when illustrating, and the panels flow VERY nicely to portray movement. Stellar use of action, great panel layouts, 10 out of 10.

All in all, Multi- is a fun, all-ages romp. I hope the art keeps improving as the story goes on, and I look forward to seeing the story unfold.

That’s all for now. Thank you for reading!

You. Are. Awesome.